Manhattan’s Textile Centre to reopen in March

Manhattan’s Textile Centre to reopen in March

The Manhattan Textile Center, a nonprofit founded by an African-American woman, is expected to open in March at 7800 Grand Avenue, a stretch of land between the Queensboro Bridge and West Broadway.

It will include a gift shop, a sewing room, a women’s boutique and a small kitchen.

The center, which has more than 1,200 volunteers, was started by an anonymous donor in 2013 and is operated by the nonprofit New Yorkers for Change.

In addition to the store, the center will offer sewing classes, and it will hold monthly conferences and other events.

“We’re not really going to talk about our financial plan,” said Carolyn D. Kress, the nonprofit’s executive director.

“There will be a lot of expenses.”

The center is expected be the largest center in the country.

Its mission is to provide quality sewing, clothing and other textile arts workshops for students of color.

Kiffmeyer said she and her husband, Bill, started the center in 2013 to provide a place where students of all races and classes can gather to learn from each other and to learn about what the arts can offer them.

The organization will have a small library, and the Kiffermans are looking to expand the program to include more than 50 workshops.

The centre’s first session, scheduled for March 14, will focus on sewing and needlework.

The second session will focus mostly on the history of women’s sewing, and a third session will be dedicated to how women in the United States have used the arts in their daily lives.

The Kiffemans will also be offering workshops for people who are interested in learning more about the history and development of the arts, said Carolyn Kiffermann.

She said she expects the center to be open in the spring.

The project is also funded by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, the New Yorkers For Change Foundation and the New Markets for Education Fund.

“It’s a great opportunity to really help these women who are trying to get into the arts and crafts field,” Kiffemer said.

“The more you get into it, the more you’re going to see that people of color are really really in demand.

The more you understand the history behind it, you’re more likely to understand how to get more women in.”

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